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A biology-modeling crosstalk to uncover feather pattern evolution

Posted by on November 20th, 2019

Richard Bailleul, Jonathan Touboul and Marie Manceau   Patterning in question: 60 years of mathematical and biological studies The coat of Vertebrates displays a stunning diversity of motifs created by the spatial arrangement of appendages and pigments across the skin surface. Strikingly, many have similar periodicity (i.e., number of repetitions within a period of space[…]

Alan Turing’s patterning system can explain the arrangement of shark scales

Posted by on November 7th, 2018

Understanding how complex biological patterns arise is a long standing and fascinating area of scientific research. The patterning, or spatial arrangement, of vertebrate skin appendages (such as feathers, hair and scales) has enabled diverse adaptations, allowing animals to both survive and thrive in varied and challenging environments. Such adaptations include temperature control of mammalian hair1[…]

How to color a lizard: from developmental biology to physics to mathematics

Posted by on June 7th, 2017

One of the research topics in Michel Milinkovitch’s laboratory (https://www.lanevol.org) at the University of Geneva (Switzerland) is to understand how squamates (lizards and snakes) generate such a tremendous variety of colours and colour patterns.     Colours The colour of a lizard’s patch of skin is generally the result of the combination among structural and[…]