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Displaying posts in the category: Research [Clear Filter]

Transparent mouse embryos and hematopoietic cell clusters

Posted by on November 8th, 2010

I was lucky in graduate school and my postdoctoral research—I was a microscopist working on a transparent organism (C. elegans).  Some microscopists don’t have that luxury, but have developed amazing techniques in order to visualize development in organisms such as mice.  In the November 1 issue of Development, Yokomizo and Dzierzak use a technique that[…]

Making life out of noise: “Stochasticity in cell and developmental processes”. Cumberland Lodge, Windsor, UK, 17-20 October, 2010. Organized by The Company of Biologists.

Posted by on October 28th, 2010

I always travel with my suitcase packed with genes. Airports, planes and trains offer me the only instances where I find two hours solid of work, and they (genes) are then my best companions. However, in my discipline – developmental biology – it seems lately that, by simply analysing more genes, we are not getting[…]

ReplicationDomain

Posted by on October 26th, 2010

ReplicationDomain is an online database resource for storing, sharing and visualizing DNA replication timing and transcription data, as well as other numerical epigenetic data types. Data is typically obtained from DNA microarrays or DNA sequencing. Our site has a user registration system that allows registered users to upload their own data sets. While non-registered users[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 22)

Posted by on October 26th, 2010

Research highlights from the current issue of Development: Novel Hh targets fly in Hedgehog (Hh), a secreted morphogen, acts in a paracrine fashion to regulate tissue patterning during embryogenesis. Its tissue-specific effects are mediated by the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), but how it exerts such effects is unclear. On p. 3887, Thomas Kornberg and[…]

Biology lecture posters

Posted by on October 21st, 2010

One of my (many) geeky passions is the overlap between art and science: Science as art (think of the Nikon image competition) or art inspired by science. That last category includes these lecture announcement posters from UNC Chapel Hill. Poster for a recent lecture by Peter Wilf The posters are designed by developmental biologist Bob[…]

Building blocks

Posted by on October 19th, 2010

Somites are the building blocks of the vertebrae, skeletal muscle and dermis…literally and figuratively.  Somites define the segmented features of vertebrate embryos, and are repeated blocks of epithelial cells formed sequentially, from anterior to posterior, and at regular intervals on either side of the neural tube.  A paper in the November 1 issue of Development[…]

Axon guidance, synaptic plasticity and regeneration meeting report

Posted by on October 13th, 2010

Cold Spring Harbor axon guidance, synaptic plasticity and regeneration conference meeting report. Great weather, loads of interesting science and plenty of drunken dancing…what more could you want from a conference.

Nippon

Posted by on October 12th, 2010

Dear Reader, My name is Dávid Molnár, I’m a third year Ph.D. student in the Department of Human Morphology and Developmental Biology at Semmelweis University (Budapest, Hungary). I’d like to share the story of my summer internship with You! Thanks to the generous offer of Guojun Sheng, the team leader of the Laboratory for Early[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 21)

Posted by on October 12th, 2010

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Oct1: essential for trophoblast development Most POU family transcription factors are temporally and spatially restricted during development and play pivotal roles in specific cell fate determination events. Oct1 (Pou2f1), however, is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic and adult mouse tissues; so, does Oct1 have a[…]

Stunning cysts

Posted by on October 6th, 2010

Hello to all of you Node readers!  My name is Erin Campbell and I’m the blogger behind HighMag Blog, a blog that features cell biology images a few times a week.  The great Eva Amsen contacted me about featuring some images on The Node, so I’m excited to be part of this growing community forum. […]