the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: imaging [Clear Filter]

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 2

Posted by on May 31st, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers. Below you will find 4 images from[…]

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 1

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers! Below you will find 4 images from[…]

A New Way To Look At Human Development

Posted by on March 29th, 2017

  Throughout history, the desire of scientists to understand physiology and disease by thoroughly studying anatomical features, has always faced an intractable limitation: they cannot simply see through the tissue! Dissection has therefore been the modus operandi of anatomists: from Galen’s pioneering studies, to modern day biologists who routinely section tissues to label structures for[…]

PhD position on tricellular junction dynamics in Drosophila at Münster, Germany

Posted by on March 25th, 2017

The Cluster of Excellence ”Cells in Motion“ (CiM) at the University of Münster invites applications for a   PhD student position (Salary Scale 13 TV-L / 65%) on   Dynamics of tricellular junctions in Drosophila   in the group of Prof. Stefan Luschnig at the Institute of Neurobiology. The position will start at the earliest[…]

Postdoctoral fellowship “Light sheet microscopy and computational image analysis of early animal morphogenesis” at IBDM Marseille

Posted by on February 14th, 2017

We are seeking to recruit a postdoctoral fellow to develop and apply high resolution light sheet microscopy in order to image cytoskeletal networks and adhesion complexes in developing embryos (e.g. Drosophila). We have recently developed a light sheet microscope for fast 3D imaging and we aim at including a new illumination scheme to achieve higher[…]

The tale of three cities – Valdivia, Jyväskylä and London

Posted by on January 23rd, 2017

This is the latest dispatch from a recipient of a Company of Biologists Travelling Fellowship. Learn more about the scheme, including how to apply, here, and read more stories from the Fellows here. Hanna Hakkinen   I am originally a Finnish evolutionary biology student who got fascinated about developmental biology during my exchange programme couple of[…]

PhD and postdoc positions in Luschnig Lab to study tricellular junctions

Posted by on November 22nd, 2016

The group of Stefan Luschnig at the Cluster of Excellence “Cells in Motion” (CiM) and the Institute of Neurobiology, University of Münster, invites applications for a PhD student and postdoc position The positions are available from February 2017 for three years. The Luschnig group investigates developmental, cellular, and molecular aspects of epithelial biology using a[…]

Scratching the surface of a rainbow

Posted by on April 26th, 2016

  Why some vertebrates like salamanders and zebrafish are able to regenerate complex tissues while humans cannot is a question that has fascinated biologists for centuries. Understanding how and why regeneration occurs in these animals can inspire novel treatment strategies for regenerative medicine. At the cellular level, the regeneration process is driven by dynamic activities[…]

Light sheet microscopy 101: Get started with a short video protocol

Posted by on April 13th, 2016

Here you can find out more about our video protocol on using light sheet microscopy to image zebrafish eye development.   Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has quickly become a popular technique in developmental biology. This method is very gentle to the samples, with fast acquisition speed and allows capturing the samples from any angle or from[…]

Moving proteins within living embryos using light

Posted by on February 24th, 2016

By Clare Buckley and Rachel Moore One of the things that we find most challenging about working with whole vertebrate organisms is how we can tie ourselves in knots trying to unpick the function of a single component within such an intricate and interconnected web of proteins and signalling cascades. All too often knocking out[…]