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Adult Neurogenesis 2018: Highlights -By Zubair Ahmed Nizamudeen

Posted by on June 29th, 2018

4WH Neurogenesis: What Where Why When and How? Neurogenesis is understood as the process by which neural stem cells (NSCs) produce new neurons. In the adult mammalian brain, this process is known to persist in two restricted locations- the dentate gyrus (DG) region of the hippocampus (see figure below) and the lateral walls of the[…]

Free webinar | Single-cell RNA-seq and cell heterogeneity in the central nervous system

Posted by on August 17th, 2016

Register here: http://bit.ly/single_cell_rna_seq_webinar  Interested in understanding RNA-seq and its application to the study of oligodendrocyte heterogeneity? Join Dr Gonçalo Castelo-Branco and Dr Amit Zeisel, of the the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysicsat the Karolinska Institutet, as they discuss the latest developments in single cell RNA-seq. Topics covered will include Technology development, applications, and challenges Investigation of[…]

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Posted by on October 23rd, 2015

Dimitri Perrin3, Shimpei I. Kubota1,2, Kazuki Tainaka1,2 & Hiroki R. Ueda1,2,4* 1Department of Systems Pharmacology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 2CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan. 3School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. 4Laboratory for Synthetic Biology, RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, Osaka,[…]

Want to attend Adult Neurogenesis 2015? Go as the official meeting reporter…

Posted by on January 12th, 2015

Adult Neurogenesis: Evolution, Regulation and Function May 6-8, 2015 – Dresden, Germany Website: http://www.abcam.com/AdultNeurogenesis2015 2015 is the 50th anniversary of Joseph Altman’s landmark discovery of adult neurogenesis. To celebrate, the fourth conference in Abcam’s Adult Neurogenesis meeting series this meeting will put the developmental process of adult neurogenesis and its regulation into the wider context[…]

‘‘Transit amplification in the cerebellum evolved via a heterochronic shift in NeuroD1 expression’’

Posted by on August 4th, 2014

They are a mouthful, paper titles, sometimes. This is exactly the sort of title that would have made me ignore it in the days when I worked on the evolution of Hox genes. But I now find myself frequently justifying to people who work on evolution why the nervous system deserves attention, and of justifying[…]

Basic Scientist – Assistant, Associate, or Professor

Posted by on January 18th, 2012

        BASIC SCIENTIST ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE, or PROFESSOR DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY / HEAD AND NECK SURGERY STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE     Faculty Position in the University Tenure Line- Basic Sciences Stanford SOM     The Department of OHNS (http://med.stanford.edu/ohns/) is recruiting for a basic science tenure-track faculty position.  The successful candidate[…]

Some of the things we have done during these two weeks

Posted by on October 27th, 2011

We have now finished the first two weeks of the course. Over these two weeks the students have learned about Drosophila as a model organism and how to set-up a Drosophila lab. They have learn about the genetics of Drosophila, which took quite some time, but now I am sure it is almost like their[…]

My journey to scientific editing

Posted by on May 24th, 2011

Although I’m no longer working at the bench, I still think of myself as a scientist. During grad school and much of my post-doc, I assumed that I would follow the “grad student to post-doc to professor track” so that I could continue to be paid to learn for the rest of my life. I’ve[…]

SfN meeting: a 21st century event

Posted by on November 3rd, 2010

The annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience kicks off in San Diego at the end of next week, and there are a lot of interesting updates even for people who, like me, are sadly *not* attending. First of all, if you’re planning to go but haven’t yet registered, you can register on site, but[…]

Pleiades Promoter Project

Posted by on September 27th, 2010

A recent paper in PNAS describes the development of MiniPromoters: human DNA promoters of less than 4 kb, designed to drive gene expression in specific areas of the brain. The initiative is called the Pleiades Promoter Project, and so far they have confirmed brain-region specific activity in knockin mice for 27 of their MiniPromoters. The[…]