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Displaying posts with the tag: segmentation [Clear Filter]

Spider segmentation gets its SOX on!

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

There is a vast amount of information known about how some animals pattern their bodies into repeated segments, especially in the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, when compared to other arthropods, there are several characteristics that are derived in the fruit fly. It has a very short development time, a syncytium at the blastoderm stage allowing[…]

Borders and communities: solving old puzzles with new tools

Posted by on May 10th, 2018

An important question in developmental biology is how regions with distinct identity are established despite the intermingling of cells that occurs during growth and morphogenesis. Our recent work revisited some old studies of how the vertebrate hindbrain is patterned, and found that sharp and homogeneous segments are formed through a combination of identity switching and[…]

The people behind the papers – Marina Matsumiya & Ryoichiro Kageyama

Posted by on February 19th, 2018

Vertebrate segmentation involves the periodic formation of somites from the presomitic mesoderm, in a manner controlled by oscillating gene expression (the oscillations of the segmentation clock must be one of the marvels of nature!). While in vivo work has provided a framework for studying the process, many aspects of segmentation dynamics are obscured in the embryo. A new Techniques[…]

On segmentation

Posted by on June 24th, 2014

‘Increasing knowledge leads to triumphant loss of clarity’ ‘The study of segmentation: that way leads only to madness’ Alfred Romer (1894 – 1973), Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology and Professor of Biology, Harvard University   Some problems in biology excite such interest as to become symptomatic of a field. This is true, I[…]