the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: is_archive [Clear Filter]

PhD DTP opportunity: Cell Biology, Univ. Manchester

Posted by on November 11th, 2019

Definition of integrin signalling networks underlying neuron growth in vivo   Application deadline: 31 January 2020 Application info: LINK Project enquiries: Andreas.Prokop@manchester.ac.uk Martin.Humphries@manchester.ac.uk   Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the plasma membrane physically tie cells together into tissues, both via interaction of cells with other cells or with ECM (extracellular matrix); they also constitute hubs[…]

Postdoc position on ageing in the Drosophila nervous system

Posted by on September 6th, 2018

BBSRC funded postdoc position in the laboratory of Natalia Sánchez-Soriano (https://sanchezlab.wordpress.com), to study the cell biology of neuronal ageing and the underlying mechanisms.     On this project you will study the harmful changes that neurons undergo at the subcellular level during ageing, and unravel the cascade of events that cause them. The focus will[…]

Manchester PhD position on neuronal development, ageing & degeneration

Posted by on October 17th, 2017

The University of Manchester, 2018/19 BBSRC DTP PhD Project Understanding tubulin regulation during neuronal development, ageing and degeneration Axons are slender, up-to-a-meter long, cable-like extensions of neurons which form the nerves and nerve tracts that wire our bodies and brain. These delicate cellular structures have to be maintained for an organism’s life time and are[…]

From our sister journals- March 2016

Posted by on March 18th, 2016

Here is some developmental biology related content from other journals published by The Company of Biologists.           Drosophila as a model to study human disease The latest issue of Disease Models & Mechanisms highlights the translational impact of Drosophila research. In this issue, Moulton and Letsou review several Drosophila models of human inborn errors of[…]

Making and re-making the brain

Posted by on December 23rd, 2015

  The three-pound lump under our skulls that allows us to speak, run and function in our daily lives is a mass of dozens of types of minuscule cells joined in an intricate web of communication. We pop out of the womb with our brains ready for us to interact with the world, but throughout[…]

Does (brain) size matter?

Posted by on October 30th, 2015

Chris Puhl and Rebecca McIntosh   As a part of a team of students from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, Kings College London we commissioned and edited an issue of The Biochemical Society’s magazine, The Biochemist. The issue is entitled ‘What makes us human’ and is a discussion of the evolutionary steps that lead to[…]

Cortical Microcircuit Assembly: The Migratory Path Matters

Posted by on June 10th, 2015

By Peng Kate Gao Developmental neuroscience has traditionally focused on understanding the structural assembly of the nervous system. However, recently it has increasingly been recognized that development also plays a key role in orchestrating the functional assembly of neural circuits1. The neocortex, the center of higher functions in the mammalian brain, can be characterized by its stereotypic lamination at[…]

Evolution of the First Nervous Systems II

Posted by on November 29th, 2013

What is the earliest Phylum of metazoans to possess what we would recognize as a nervous system? Did earlier organisms have all the components of a nervous system in the absence of what we would recognize as neurons? What is a neuron? Did nervous systems evolve independently more than once? Where were all the molecular[…]

A stem cell needs REST

Posted by on August 14th, 2012

Decisions, decisions.  Stem cells face the task to self-renew or differentiate, a decision made out of the combination and coordination of numerous regulators.  With the activation or suppression of transcriptional activators and the activation or suppression of repressors, it’s easy to see how understanding this process is anything BUT easy.  Today’s images are from a[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 17)

Posted by on August 9th, 2011

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: Human embryos make an early transcriptional start Human preimplantation development is a highly dynamic process that lasts about 6 days. During this time, the embryo must complete a complex program that includes activation of embryonic genome transcription and initiation of the pluripotency program. Here, Juan[…]