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10 PhD Positions at the CRC 1348 “Dynamic Cellular Interfaces: Formation and Function”, Münster, Germany

Posted by on June 11th, 2018

            The Collaborative Research Centre 1348 “Dynamic Cellular Interfaces: Formation and Function” at the University of Münster, Germany, invites applications for   10 PhD Positions (salary level E13 TV-L, 65%) Projects are available from the earliest possible date for three years. Currently, the regular full employment time is 39 hours[…]

Postdoctoral position on the mechanobiology of vertebrate morphogenesis

Posted by on June 4th, 2018

The Nerurkar Lab is looking for Postdoctoral Researchers with an interest in the interplay between molecular and mechanical aspects of vertebrate morphogenesis. Using the chick embryo, we combine live in vivo imaging, embryology and molecular genetics with engineering and physics approaches to study how developmental signals modulate physical forces that shape the embryo, and how[…]

Sensing and making sense of clonal fragmentation in developing tissues

Posted by on March 23rd, 2018

Steffen Rulands and Benjamin Simons A discussion of our recent paper: Rulands S et al., Universality of clone dynamics during tissue development. Nature Physics | doi:10.1038/s41567-018-0055-6   Often, the most enjoyable research projects are the ones that were never planned; and so it was with the current study.   In developmental biology, genetic lineage tracing[…]

Understanding cell- and tissue-level decision-making – a tense and crowded situation in the skin!

Posted by on February 23rd, 2018

The story behind our paper: Yekaterina A. Miroshnikova*, Huy Q. Le*, David Schneider*, Torsten Thalheim, Matthias Rübsam, Nadine Bremicker, Julien Polleux, Nadine Kamprad, Marco Tarantola, Irène Wang, Martial Balland, Carien M. Niessen, Joerg Galle & Sara A. Wickström. Adhesion forces and cortical tension couple cell proliferation and differentiation to drive epidermal stratification. Nature Cell Biology 20, p69–80[…]

Postdoctoral Position – Imaging of adhesion dynamics and in vivo probing of tissue mechanics

Posted by on January 16th, 2018

Two postdoctoral positions are open at the Institute of Developmental Biology (IBDM) in Marseille (France) to visualize the dynamics of adhesion complexes and probe the cellular and tissue-level mechanics of developing embryos. Successful candidates will develop a project in the context of an interdisciplinary collaboration between the groups of Thomas Lecuit, a biologist, and Pierre-François Lenne,[…]

Organelle Assembly in Vivo: The Love-Hate Relationship of Thermodynamic and Active Processes

Posted by on March 6th, 2017

Comment on ”Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern nucleolus assembly in vivo”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114 (6), 1335-1340, (2017). Hanieh Falahati, Lewis–Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University. Eric Wieschaus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University.   The whole universe is moving toward disorder; this is the[…]

Question of the month- interdisciplinary research

Posted by on July 29th, 2015

Developmental biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary, as biologists team up with physicists and mathematicians to address new and classical problems in the field from a new perspective. But should we all be pursuing such an approach or is there still room for ‘pure’ developmental biology approaches? Should we incorporate more physics/mathematics modules in the training of[…]

Between Genetics and Physics

Posted by on July 15th, 2015

The predominant approach to studying development is based on genetics. In fact, some have gone so far as to argue that many researchers approach the whole problem of development as “the interplay of cell-cell signaling and transcriptional regulation” (Gerhart 2015). However, in recent years there has been increasing recognition of approaches to understanding development that[…]

Nuclear sponges in embryonic stem cells

Posted by on June 17th, 2014

Once upon a time, physicists got curious about the cytoskeleton. They characterised the cytoskeleton – using tools of soft matter, statistical and polymer physics – as a mesoscale material whose physical properties govern its dynamics. They showed that the cytoskeleton is an interconnected scaffold that, depending on the time scale, can behave like a shape-morphing[…]

Wave at the frogs – they’re waving at you

Posted by on July 26th, 2013

  Perhaps, like me, you’ve been microinjecting Xenopus embryos for so long that you start seeing strange things – maybe that they’re waving at you.  But perhaps that’s not so crazy as it sounds.  In a letter to Nature this week (you can also view this talk), Jeremy Chang and James Ferrell Jr. from Stanford discuss the evidence[…]