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Displaying posts with the tag: c-elegans [Clear Filter]

Glia lead the way for pioneers to build the brain neuropil in C. elegans

Posted by on October 20th, 2017

It’s all about the wires. But what about the glue? Networks make us who we are. I am not talking about social networks but about neural networks that define how we perceive the world and how we act. For a century, neuroscientists have sought to understand functions of neural networks in condition and how such[…]

The people behind the papers – Dan Dickinson

Posted by on September 29th, 2017

Cell polarisation is crucial for normal development and controlled by complex molecular interactions in the cytoplasm and at the membrane. Today we feature a paper recently published in Developmental Cell that describes  a single-cell biochemistry technique and its insights into polarity protein dynamics the developing worm embryo. We caught up with first author Dan Dickinson, who carried out the work as a postdoc[…]

The people behind the papers – Diane Shakes & friends

Posted by on September 20th, 2017

Development often involves the asymmetric partitioning of cellular components to daughters, and this process is crucial for successful gametogenesis. Today’s paper, published in the current issue of Development, explores the cytoskeletal mechanisms of spermatogenesis in different nematode species. We met the multi-lab team behind the work, starting with Diane Shakes (The College of William and Mary in[…]

The people behind the papers: Thanh Vuong-Brender & Michel Labouesse

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

This year marks the centenary of D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form, an attempt to outline the physical and mathematical principles underpinning the generation of biological form. Modern day developmental biologists, bolstered by new technologies, have taken up Thompson’s cause to try to understand the mechanics of development, particularly with regard to morphogenesis. While the generation[…]

Uncovering Non-canonical Roles of E-cadherin Beyond Cell Adhesion

Posted by on February 14th, 2017

Broad perspective Successful division was an essential criterion for establishing the cell as the basic unit of life on earth. Later, cell-cell adhesion made possible the evolution of multicellular life forms. These two fundamental cellular processes co-function throughout the life of an organism, during development, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In epithelial tissues this results[…]

Developing the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system for versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans

Posted by on March 19th, 2016

By Liangyu Zhang and Abby F. Dernburg    The nematode Caenorhabidis elegans is among the most widely used and powerful model organisms for studying mechanisms underlying cellular and developmental processes. Although a variety of approaches for conditional protein expression have been developed in C. elegans, available tools for conditional protein depletion are far more limited,[…]

An interview with Philip Zegerman

Posted by on September 15th, 2015

This interview first featured in the Journal of Cell Science and is part of their interview series Cell Scientists to Watch   Philip Zegerman earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Cambridge, where he later also pursued a PhD in the lab of Tony Kouzarides at the Gurdon Institute. For his postdoctoral work, he switched[…]

BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (3)

Posted by on February 3rd, 2015

In 2014, the British Society of Developmental Biology (BSDB) has initiated the Gurdon Summer Studentship program with the intention to provide highly motivated students with exceptional qualities and a strong interest in Developmental Biology an opportunity to engage in practical research. The 10 successful applicants spent 8 weeks in the research laboratories of their choices,[…]

A day in the life of a C. elegans lab

Posted by on March 3rd, 2014

I am Serena Ding, a third year PhD student, and I work at the University of Oxford’s Biochemistry Department in the United Kingdom. I am interested in the control of cell divisions, specifically in stem cells. In Dr Alison Woollard’s lab, we use a microscopic nematode called Caenorhabditis elegans as a stem cell model.  […]

RI Christmas Lectures 2013- Developmental Biology in the spotlight

Posted by on December 20th, 2013

The Royal Institution Christmas Lectures are an annual event where science is celebrated and young people are inspired. This year’s lectures celebrate the Life Fantastic, and will showcase the excitement, beauty and medical potential of developmental biology.   If you were brought up in the UK, the Royal Institution (RI) Christmas Lectures will have been[…]