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Displaying posts with the tag: cilia [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers #13

Posted by on February 8th, 2017

Radial glial cells are multipotent progenitors in the developing vertebrate brain. At their apical interface with the ventricular cavity around which the brain forms, they bear a primary cilium, a signalling and sensory organelle crucial for proper brain development. Today’s paper, from a recent issue of Development, addresses the link between these primary cilia and brain morphogenesis.[…]

In Development This Week (Vol. 138, Issue 22)

Posted by on October 25th, 2011

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: The skin-healing touch of Lhx2 Skin repair after injury involves the recruitment of undifferentiated progenitor cells from nearby hair follicles (HFs) into the regenerating epidermis. The bulge and the secondary hair germ of HFs contain distinct populations of epithelial stem cells, and now Vladimir Botchkarev[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 16)

Posted by on July 26th, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Pushing the nuclear envelope Not all nuclei are regular spheres as is often shown in textbooks. For example, in Drosophila embryos, nuclei are initially spherical but they elongate and acquire an irregular lobulated morphology during cellularisation. These morphological changes coincide with transcriptional activation of[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 6)

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Arteriovenous-specific regulation of angiogenesis Endothelial cells (ECs) assume arterial- or venous-specific molecular characteristics at early stages of development. These lineage-specific molecular programmes subsequently instruct the development of the distinct vascular architectures of arteries and veins. Now, on p. 1173, Jau-Nian Chen and co-workers investigate[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 24)

Posted by on November 23rd, 2010

Pak1-ing a punch in lumen formation The generation and maintenance of correct lumen size and shape is essential for the function of tubular organs. Now, Monn Monn Myat and co-workers report that p21-activated kinase (Pak1) plays a novel role during lumen formation in Drosophila embryonic salivary glands (see p. 4177). The researchers show that Pak1[…]

In Development this week (Volume 137, Issue 18)

Posted by on August 24th, 2010

Non-muscle myosin II translates cilia polarity In the brain, cilia on the multiciliated ependymal cells that line the brain ventricles circulate cerebrospinal fluid over the brain surface. To generate this directional fluid flow, the ependymal cell cilia and their basal bodies must be orientated in one direction. This ‘rotational’ polarity is regulated by the planar[…]