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Displaying posts with the tag: embryonic-stem-cells [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers: Rute Tomaz & Véronique Azuara

Posted by on February 15th, 2017

Embryonic stem cells express genes necessary for self-renewal, and also ‘prime’ lineage-specific genes which stay silent until differentiation; the molecular players and pathways that govern the timely gene expression are still being delineated. Today’s paper comes from the most recent issue of Development and reveals a role for the histone demethylase Jmjd2c in gene activation in stem cell[…]

Staff Scientist/Research Assistant II – Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cartilage Biology

Posted by on October 10th, 2016

We are looking for an enthusiastic and highly motivated Staff Scientist or experienced Research Assistant/Technician to join the stem cell and regenerative medicine-based laboratory of Dr. April Craft, within the department of Orthopaedic Research at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Our lab studies the development of musculoskeletal tissues, primarily articular cartilage, using human[…]

Post-doctoral Position available – Cartilage Development and Disease, Pluripotent stem cells

Posted by on October 10th, 2016

We are looking for an outstanding, highly motivated postdoctoral fellow to join our innovative young department in the stem cell and regenerative medicine-focused laboratory of Dr. April Craft, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Our lab studies the development of musculoskeletal tissues, primarily cartilage, using human and mouse[…]

Postdoctoral researcher position in developmental/stem cell biology-University of Sheffield

Posted by on October 6th, 2016

We are currently seeking an independent and motivated scientist to join the research group led by Dr Anestis Tsakiridis (https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/cscb/tsakiridis). His work focuses on dissecting the molecular basis of cell fate decisions in the developing embryo and aims to exploit this knowledge for disease-modelling and regenerative medicine applications. The group is particularly interested in the biology of neuromesodermal progenitors[…]

The small beginnings of gastruloids

Posted by on April 1st, 2015

Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are by definition cells that can self-renew (make identical copies of themselves) and specialize into any cell type of the body. Since their discovery, scientists have used them to produce various specialized cell types in culture but also to produce transgenic mouse lines. When injected into a mouse early embryo,[…]

Stem cells…now showing in 3D

Posted by on January 22nd, 2015

    Growing organs in vitro is one of the ultimate dreams of any stem cell biologist. As such, it seems obvious that some of these organs will need to be grown in 3D. This is why stem cell 3D culture systems are very fashionable among scientists. They are increasingly successful and a fair amount[…]

Human Stem Cell research: new ethical questions?

Posted by on October 21st, 2014

The Ethics Session at the Company of Biologists “From Stem Cells to Human Development” workshop Last September the Company Of Biologists organized an exciting three-day dive into the biology of human stem cells and their use to study human development and regeneration (look out for the full meeting report in Development, coming soon, and Katherine[…]

Towards a synthetic embryo

Posted by on September 24th, 2014

Waddington, whose writings on the epigenetic landscape continue to influence developmental biology to this day, called the developing embryo “the most intriguing object that nature has to offer”(Waddington, 1966). The mechanisms of pattern formation and morphogenesis have fascinated biologists for centuries. One question that is difficult to answer is what are the minimal requirements for[…]

Nuclear sponges in embryonic stem cells

Posted by on June 17th, 2014

Once upon a time, physicists got curious about the cytoskeleton. They characterised the cytoskeleton – using tools of soft matter, statistical and polymer physics – as a mesoscale material whose physical properties govern its dynamics. They showed that the cytoskeleton is an interconnected scaffold that, depending on the time scale, can behave like a shape-morphing[…]

Stone Soup Eyes

Posted by on April 16th, 2014

Another installment from the Developmental Neurobiology Students at Reed College. Hope you enjoy! It’s not often that you get to recount the classic tale of Stone Soup when thinking about developmental biology, but that’s exactly what we did when discussing an almost classic 2011 Nature paper from Yoshiki Sasai’s group. In the story, a grumpy[…]