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Displaying posts with the tag: evolutionary-developmental-biology [Clear Filter]

IGNITE Research Fellow (PhD candidate): Comparative and functional genomics of oogenesis and animal-vegetal embryonic axis specification

Posted by on February 8th, 2018

There is a vacancy for a 3-year PhD position (Early Stage Researcher) for a fixed term of 3 years at the Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology affiliated with the project “Comparative Development of Animals”. The PhD position is financed by the MSC Innovative Training Network “IGNITE” (http://www.itn-ignite.eu). IGNITE is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network that will gather together this European excellence to train a new generation of scientists skilled in all aspects of invertebrate genomics.

EvoCELL Research Fellow (PhD candidate) in Mesoderm Evolution: Formation of gonads and germ line during early embryogenesis

Posted by on February 8th, 2018

There is a vacancy for a PhD position (Early Stage Researcher) for a fixed term of 3 years at the Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology affiliated with the project “Mesoderm Evolution”. This PhD position is subject to funding by the MSC Innovative Training Network “EvoCELL”. EvoCELL is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network aiming at studying the evolution of cell-types and tissues in a diverse array of vertebrates and invertebrates.

Why more is better in comparative developmental biology…

Posted by on January 26th, 2018

Our recent paper in “Nature” [1] deconstructs molecular arguments that have been used to homologize bilaterian nerve cords. Our work illustrates well the strength of the comparative approach and the broad sampling across the animal tree of life that we use in my research group at the Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology.   Evo-Devo[…]

A Tale of Trunks or Zen and the art of doing a PhD

Posted by on September 1st, 2016

The story of this paper is also the story of my PhD. It begins as most papers and PhDs do: with a distinct and often unrelated starting project or plan. It is great to have a plan. But time and luck and data bend and twist the plan; until it finally breaks and you end[…]

Applications for the 122nd Embryology Course at the MBL in Woods Whole, MA are due February 2nd.

Posted by on January 16th, 2015

We invite you to apply for admission to the longest-running course in the history of Embryology. An intensive six-week laboratory and lecture course for advanced graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and more senior researchers who seek a broad and balanced view of the modern issues of developmental biology. Limited to 24 students. The integrated lectures and[…]

Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology – Inaugural 2015 Meeting

Posted by on January 14th, 2015

We welcome you to join us for the inaugural meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology, which will be held on the Clark Kerr Campus at the University of California Berkeley from August 5-9, 2015.  The meeting will feature an exciting lineup of 22 invited plenary speakers with an incredible diversity of approaches[…]

A day in the life of a shark lab

Posted by on October 31st, 2014

Hi! I am Nuria, a PhD student. I work in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Our group, the BRAINSHARK group, has been working in the evolutionary changes occurring during the development of the nervous system of a small shark (Scyliorhinus canicula) for many years. Our work mostly[…]

On the origins of species-specific size

Posted by on February 25th, 2014

by Jennifer L. Fish and Richard A. Schneider   “For every type of animal there is a most convenient size, and a large change in size inevitably carries with it a change of form.” Haldane 1926.   As articulated most eloquently by Haldane (1926) in his classic essay on “Being the Right Size”, every animal[…]