the community site for and by developmental biologists

BBSRC DTP – 4-Year PhD Studentship – Cytokinetic variation: investigating the interaction between cell identity and cytokinesis

Posted by on April 30th, 2020

Project Description Cell division is fundamental to life and errors can result in abnormal chromosomal numbers, developmental defects, and cancers. Similarities in the structural and molecular organization of the division apparatus gives the textbook picture, that mechanisms underlying division, including formation and constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring, do not vary between cell and organism[…]

Dissecting modes of pattern formation using live imaging and Hidden Markov Models

Posted by on April 30th, 2020

Background/History In the early fly embryo, information encoded in a handful of maternally deposited protein gradients is fed forward through increasingly intricate layers of interacting genes, culminating in the differentiation of the embryo into functional body segments with a high degree of spatial and temporal precision[1],[2]. Short segments of regulatory DNA known as enhancers lie[…]

Scientific conference reform: scientists respond to Sarabipour et al. 2020

Posted by on April 28th, 2020

I wrote to several colleagues in the process of highlighting (preLight here) a recent preprint on conference reform by Sarabipour et al., some involved in organising conferences, others invested in ECR career development, publishing, and publishing reform. Here are their comments (I will update this resource as I hear back from more people):     Jessica[…]

Dynamic display of data with animated plots

Posted by on April 27th, 2020

Data from time-lapse experiments is often displayed in a graph or plot, to visualize the dynamics of biological systems (Goedhart, 2020). Ironically, the perception of the dynamics is largely lost in a static plot. That’s where animated plots come in. Animated plots are a great way to display the dynamics of the underlying data. Below, I[…]

JoVE for developmental biology research and eduction

Posted by on April 24th, 2020

Dear Developmental Biologists, We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Node for the chance to write a post about JoVE and how our resources can be beneficial for the research and teaching of developmental biology and multiple other disciplines. All researchers will be familiar with the challenges of replicating an experiment you’ve[…]

Genetics Unzipped: Twisted history – the true story of the double helix

Posted by on April 23rd, 2020

There’s more to the story of the double helix than Watson and Crick. We unwind history to uncover some of the less well-known figures behind the discovery of the structure and function of DNA.

the Node turns 10 – please take our user survey

Posted by on April 23rd, 2020

This year the Node hits double digits – our first post was published way back on April 1, 2010 (we’re now at over three and a half thousand posts and counting, and get over thirty thousand page views a month). We’ll be celebrating this developmental milestone with a look over some of our favourite content[…]

Free, Cool, Developmental Biology Meeting In Your Own Living Room!

Posted by on April 21st, 2020

The Southeast Regional Society for Developmental Biology Conference will be held virtually in a Zoom Webinar on May 20-21.     Registration is required for all attendees by May 6, 2020 (limited space).  Registration is Free, please use Fee Waiver Code: FREE when completing your registration.   Abstract submission for short talks will be through April 30, with notification[…]

Zipping up the neural tube

Posted by on April 21st, 2020

Matteo A. Molè & Andrew J. Copp Molè et al., Integrin-Mediated Focal Anchorage Drives Epithelial Zippering during Mouse Neural Tube Closure. Dev. Cell. 52, 321-334.e6 (2020). Zippering is a striking phenomenon whereby two opposing epithelial tissues become progressively united in one direction over a period of time. Similar, to the travel of a zip fastener,[…]

Laboratory of Developmental biology of the heart In Marseilles (South of France) is looking for a postdoctoral fellow to apply to the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships program to work on a project of embryonic senescence in mouse embryos

Posted by on April 21st, 2020

We are looking for a motivated young scientist with a good track record of publications. The project will use start of the art technologies including single-cell RNA-seq, spatial transcriptomics, high content cell imaging, microChIP, and genetic lineage tracing of senescent cells in the heart. The project will specifically focus on epigenetic and metabolic regulated pathways[…]