the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: development [Clear Filter]

Zebrafish transgenes go ubiquitous

Posted by on December 7th, 2010

The Node’s staff has kindly asked me to write a little “behind the scenes” on our zebrafish paper released today in Development, “Ubiquitous transgene expression and Cre-based recombination driven by the ubiquitin promoter in zebrafish” (http://dev.biologists.org/content/138/1/169). The spark to pursue the project were the first conversations I had in spring 2008 with senior postdocs in[…]

WormBase: It’s not just for C. elegans anymore

Posted by on October 29th, 2010

WormBase — wormbase.org — is the central data repository for Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes. C. elegans is a well-known system for studying problems in developmental biology, the benefits of which I will quickly rehash here. Its rapid generation time from fertilized egg to gravid adult (3.5 days) and small size (1mM) permit 1000’s of[…]

Development Travelling Fellowships

Posted by on September 16th, 2010

Hello Node Community: I would like to inform you about the Development Travelling Fellowships. Are you a Graduate student or Post-doc wishing to make a collaborative visit to another lab? You can apply to Development to fund your travelling expenses. Development offers up to £2,500, you do of course have to be working in the[…]

Of White and Ancient Feathers

Posted by on August 9th, 2010

I’ve just come back from a lab retreat in a country house in Sussex, UK. The weather was good and we had our scientific sessions, ranging from discussions on Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the neural tube to the latest super-resolution imaging techniques, outdoors in the courtyard. However, every once in a while, we would be[…]

Development Editors Meeting

Posted by on July 19th, 2010

On July 9, the editors of Development met in Strasbourg (or joined over the phone) for a meeting. Because Development‘s editors are spread out all over the world, these meetings are a rare opportunity to get everyone together to discuss the journal. Editors all get a chance to share ideas they have for the journal,[…]

BSDB-BSCB Meeting Report Part III

Posted by on July 10th, 2010

Here is the final part of my meeting report on the BSDB-BSCB Spring Conference this April in Warwick. In the first part, I covered some of the talks on transcriptional regulation, and in part two I gave a brief overview on recent attempts to decipher large-scale transcription factor networks. In this final part I will[…]

In Development, Vol 137 (Issue 14)

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development. You can find these on the Development site but we thought it would be useful to have them posted on the Node, too. Brainy signals for actin dynamics During brain development, neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration establish the brain architecture needed for brain function.[…]

BSDB-BSCB Meeting Report Part II

Posted by on June 21st, 2010

As announced in my last post, here is part two of the BSDB-BSCB Spring Meeting Report. It deals with two presentations on networks of transcription factors (TFs). During development, such dynamic networks of TFs and signaling molecules establish and maintain the spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression characteristic for the developing tissue. Using high throughput approaches[…]

Development editors at the helm of developmental biology societies

Posted by on June 16th, 2010

(Originally posted in Development) Development editors Liz Robertson (Professor of Developmental Biology at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology in Oxford) and Alexandra Joyner (Courtney Steel Chair in Pediatric Cancer Research and Professor in the Department of Developmental Biology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York) are not only actively involved in research[…]

BSDB-BSCB Meeting Report Part I

Posted by on June 12th, 2010

The recent joint meeting of the British Societies for Developmental Biology (BSDB) and Cell Biology (BSCB) in Warwick provided an exciting opportunity to catch a glimpse of the future of these two fields. “Old” questions of how cell fates are allocated during development are now being tackled with new technologies and new knowledge of how[…]