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The people behind the papers – Ding Li and Jianbo Wang

Posted by on November 29th, 2019

This interview, the 72nd in our series, was recently published in Development.  Heart development in mammals is a beautifully complex process. Patterning, proliferation and differentiation are all coordinated with cell movements and tissue morphogenesis (for instance elongation, fusion, folding, looping). However, our knowledge of the molecular regulators of heart development currently outstrips what we know about the[…]

Secret talk between epithelium and endothelium determines hair follicle stem cell fate

Posted by on November 6th, 2019

By Kefei Nina Li and Prachi Jain   Stem cells are typically defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate. These activities are tightly controlled by both intrinsic cues and extrinsic cues from the microenvironment, known as the SC niche. This niche consists of multiple components, among which blood vessels (BVs) are critical as they[…]

Postdoctoral position in Quantitative Live Imaging of Cell Fate Choice and Organization

Posted by on October 16th, 2019

The Posfai Lab at Princeton University (www.Posfailab.org) is looking to recruit a highly motivated postdoctoral fellow to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cell fate choice and emergent organization during early embryonic development, using the preimplantation mouse embryo as a model system. The project will combine genetic engineering and quantitative, high-resolution live imaging using[…]

The people behind the papers – Shai Eyal and Elazar Zelzer

Posted by on August 13th, 2019

This interview, the 67th in our series, was recently published in Development Most bones in the vertebrate skeleton are made in the same way – endochondrial ossification – yet they display a variety of shapes and sizes. The question of how these unique bone morphologies, including the superstructures that protrude from their surfaces, arise during development is[…]

POSTDOC IN DEVELOPMENTAL METABOLISM (Francis Crick Institute, London)

Posted by on July 12th, 2019

Roles of metabolism in the developmental origins of health and longevity A postdoctoral research position funded by the Wellcome Trust is available in the laboratory of Dr. Alex Gould at the Francis Crick Institute in London. The lab works on the mechanisms by which dietary nutrients during development can have profound long-term effects upon adult[…]

Gene Targeting Specialist – Babraham Institute

Posted by on June 18th, 2019

Location: Babraham Institute Starting salary: £36,500 to £45,500 per annum Contract type: Permanent Closing date: 10 July 2019 We are seeking a proactive and highly motivated individual to deliver gene targeting capabilities at the Babraham Institute.  The successful applicant will work closely with scientific staff and will be embedded in the Epigenetics Programme in order to[…]

The people behind the papers – Li-Juan Duan and Guo-Hua Fong

Posted by on May 23rd, 2019

This interview, the 62nd in our series, was recently published in Development Vascular development critically involves pruning, which helps to remodel an immature network containing excess microvessels into a mature and functioning one. The mechanisms of vascular remodelling and the relationship between the endothelial cells and the other cell types with which they are closely associated are,[…]

The people behind the papers – Nathalie Rion and Markus Rüegg

Posted by on April 18th, 2019

This interview, the 60th in our series, was recently published in Development In development and during regeneration in adults, muscle fibres develop from muscle progenitor cells, and the proliferation, differentiation and fusion of these progenitors needs to be tightly controlled and co-ordinated. A new paper in Development studies the role of the mTOR protein in this process using genetic[…]

Making Multiciliated Cells: The Guardians of Our Airways

Posted by on April 1st, 2019

With air pollution on the rise, our respiratory system is continually abused by a barrage of harmful substances that we breathe in with each inhalation. Fortunately, we are equipped with highly specialised ciliated cells, the multiciliated cells (MCCs), which differentiate hundreds of motile cilia on their apical surface1,2. These cilia beat rhythmically to drive mucus[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast – Supermodels of science

Posted by on February 28th, 2019

 In this episode from our series exploring 100 ideas in genetics, we’re entering the glamorous world of modelling, meeting the supermodels… of science. We’re taking a look at some of the field’s top models – the eclectic collection of organisms that have been put to work in the lab to reveal the secrets of biology.[…]