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2011 Gairdner Awards Recipients Announced

Posted by on April 8th, 2011

The recipients of Canada’s most prestigious science awards, the Gairdner Awards, was recently announced.  The Awards recognize researchers for their contributions to the field of medical research.  The 2011 Gairdner Awards Recipients are: 2011 Canada Gairdner International Awards: Adrian Peter Bird Ph.D., Howard Cedar M.D., Ph.D., and Aharon Razin Ph.D. for their discoveries on DNA[…]

A new view on eye development

Posted by on April 7th, 2011

You’ve seen the news: ES cells generate a 3D retinal structure. But what does this tell us about eye development? In the developing embryo, the first step toward a functional eye is the formation of the optic vesicle from the neural tube. This optic vesicle then invaginates to form an optic cup, which in turn[…]

Seeing Further

Posted by on March 29th, 2011

The Royal Society has collected a series of images that illustrate the moment important scientific discoveries were made. This “Moments of Seeing Further” collection includes a notebook sketch from 1980, contributed by Sir John E. Sulston and depicting cell division in C. elegans – work that contributed to the discovery of the fate map of[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 8):

Posted by on March 22nd, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Fishing out adult neural stem cells Adult neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and nervous system injuries. To date, adult neurogenesis has been mainly studied in rodents but, on p. 1459, Laure Bally-Cuif and co-workers use GFP-encoding[…]

YEN Seminar Next Week – March 24

Posted by on March 17th, 2011

We are delighted to announce the first double-seminar session hosted by the Young Embryologist Network (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/cdb/yen) on March 24th from 4pm – 6pm (& refreshments afterwards) in the A.V. Hill Lecture Theatre, Medical Sciences Building, UCL. The theme of this session is visualising biological processes and there will be 2 speakers: – Dr Florencia Cavodeassi (Steve Wilson Group, Dept[…]

The amazing neural crest

Posted by on March 9th, 2011

The power of stem cells lies in the ability to give rise to many different cell types.  The stem cells found in the neural crest are no exception, and a recent Development paper describes the importance of Foxd3 in maintaining self-renewal and multipotency of these stem cells, and in regulating the fate choice of these[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 7)

Posted by on March 8th, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: A breath of fresh air: miRNAs regulate lung development Throughout development, a proper balance between the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells is essential but the gene regulatory networks that control this balance are only partly understood. Here, Edward Morrisey and colleagues report that[…]

iPSC timeline

Posted by on March 3rd, 2011

Science writer Ed Yong put together an interactive timeline of breakthroughs in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), inspired by a manifesto that called for more clarity in the media about the way scientific research is carried out. The timeline puts individual news articles about iPSC into a much broader context. Reprogrammed stem[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 6)

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Arteriovenous-specific regulation of angiogenesis Endothelial cells (ECs) assume arterial- or venous-specific molecular characteristics at early stages of development. These lineage-specific molecular programmes subsequently instruct the development of the distinct vascular architectures of arteries and veins. Now, on p. 1173, Jau-Nian Chen and co-workers investigate[…]

Around the web

Posted by on February 17th, 2011

The early embryology of the chick Coffee and Sci(ence) features the 90-year-old book “The Early Embryology of the Chick” by Bradley Patten. The book is now out of copyright, and you can find the whole thing online at the Internet Archive. “This book on the development of the chick has been written for those who[…]