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Displaying posts with the tag: cell-migration [Clear Filter]

Pitx2c sets the stage for gastrulation

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

In our recently published paper https://elifesciences.org/articles/34880, we report that the transcription factor Pitx2c has an unexpected role during gastrulation, where it acts cell non-autonomously to promote mesendodermal cell migration required for axis extension in zebrafish.     “It is not birth, marriage or death which is the most important time in your life, but gastrulation. –[…]

The people behind the papers – Martina Nagel & Rudolf Winklbauer

Posted by on July 6th, 2018

Contact inhibition of locomotion is a widespread phenomenon in migrating cells. However, cells often migrate collectively as a sheet, raising the question of how contact inhibition is overcome in these scenarios. A new paper in Development addresses this problem by studying the signals that regulate collective migration in Xenopus leading edge mesendoderm (LEM) cells. We[…]

The people behind the papers – You Wu & Mineko Kengaku

Posted by on March 12th, 2018

Neuronal migration is critical for mammalian brain development. In many migrating neurons, the nucleus translocates from the trailing to the leading edge of the cell in a manner dependent on the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, but how these cytoskeletons interact and their relative contribution to the forces that move the nucleus has remained unclear. This[…]

The people behind the papers – Chloé Dominici & Alain Chédotal

Posted by on January 18th, 2018

Vertebrate brain development is characterised by cell migration, as neurons are often born far from where they need to end up. Migration is regulated by guidance cues and their receptors, but, problematically, many of these molecules are expressed throughout the brain, complicating efforts to spatially and temporally pin down their function. A paper in the[…]

The protein that keeps cells static is found to play a key role in cell movement

Posted by on August 14th, 2015

The protein E-Cadherin (E-Cad) is a kind of adhesive that keeps cells tightly bound together, thus favouring the organisation of tissues and organs. Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) now reveal a new function for E-Cad, one that contrasts with its accepted role in impeding cell movement. The researchers have published[…]

Electrifying news for embryologists

Posted by on June 17th, 2014

Electroporation: an efficient technique for embryologists During embryonic development, the specification of different cell types giving rise to the future organs involves a precise spatiotemporal regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Studying these processes requires tools to manipulate gene expression locally in the developing embryo.To this aim, embryologists have widely used the technique of[…]

A study using Drosophila flies reveals new regulatory mechanisms of cell migration

Posted by on March 21st, 2014

A study by Sofia J. Araújo, a Ramón y Cajal researcher with the Morphogenesis in Drosophila lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), elucidates the genetic regulation of cell migration. Published today in the scientific journal Plos One, the research is part of the thesis work performed by Elisenda Butí, first author of[…]

Dicty World Race – 2014

Posted by on March 1st, 2014

The first ever World Dicty Race  will require cells to navigate a complex microfluidic maze to reach a pool of chemoattractant at the finish line.  Diffusion of the chemoattractant will create a spatial gradient to guide cells along the shortest path to the finish line. The challenge is to engineer Dicty or HL60 cells to[…]

World Cell Race 2013

Posted by on November 22nd, 2013

Usain Bolt may be the fastest man alive, but which is the fastest cell? Since 2011 that the World Cell Race has been trying to answer this question. The motivation behind the competition is not only to find the fastest cell, but also to understand and discuss cell mobility. Cell movement is very important during development[…]

Postdoc position

Posted by on January 4th, 2013

A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Sophie Astrof to study roles of cell-extracellular matrix interactions in cardiovascular development and disease using mouse model system. The research will involve investigation of the role of extracellular matrix in orchestrating signaling/communication between various progenitor cell populations during morphogenesis of the aortic arch arteries.  In[…]