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Displaying posts with the tag: embryogenesis [Clear Filter]

FASEB 2017 BioArt Winners

Posted by on December 13th, 2017

Here at the Node we are always on the lookout for beautiful developmental biology images and videos, and love our science art (see here, here, here, here and here!). So we were excited to hear FASEB announce the winners of their 2017 BioArt competition.  As well as gorgeous images (see below) there was this wonderful video – the[…]

The people behind the papers – Qiang Shao, Stephanie Herrlinger and Jian-Fu (Jeff) Chen

Posted by on November 16th, 2017

Zika infection in humans is associated with birth defects including microcephaly. Zika has two major lineages – the Asian lineage, which has been associated with birth defects, and the African lineage, which has not – but the relative effects of each strain on brain development, and the effects of the related dengue virus that co-circulates with[…]

Glia lead the way for pioneers to build the brain neuropil in C. elegans

Posted by on October 20th, 2017

It’s all about the wires. But what about the glue? Networks make us who we are. I am not talking about social networks but about neural networks that define how we perceive the world and how we act. For a century, neuroscientists have sought to understand functions of neural networks in condition and how such[…]

The right information

Posted by on October 19th, 2017

Oscar H. Ocaña and M. Angela Nieto Comment on “A right-handed signalling pathway drives heart looping in vertebrates”. Nature 549, 86-90 (2017).   A fundamental aspect of vertebrates is their external bilateral symmetry, which has to some extent shaped evolutionary success. Not only is beauty associated with symmetry, enhancing an individual’s chance of mating but[…]

Research assistant in Development Biology, Sheffield University

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

A Wellcome Trust/Royal Society funded Research Assistant position is available in Dr Kyra Campbell’s research group. This is a fantastic opportunity to join the Campbell group, who are focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial cell plasticity during development and disease. We study how this fundamental property is orchestrated during morphogenesis of the Drosophila[…]

YEN Conference 2017: Registration open now!

Posted by on February 8th, 2017

Young Embryologist Network 9th Annual Conference. 9th May 2017 at the Institute of Child Health, UCL, London. This year, YEN is honoured to have Dr Darren Gilmour from EMBL Heidelberg present the Sammy Lee Memorial Lecture. We are also pleased to host two invited speakers, Dr Karen Liu (King’s College London), and Professor Michael Stumpf (Imperial College London). As well as three abstract-selected talk sessions and a poster[…]

Forgotten classics- Regulating the size of the mouse embryo

Posted by on April 6th, 2016

  Snow, M. H. L., Tam, P. P. L. (1979) Is compensatory growth a complicating factor in mouse teratology? Nature 279, 555-557 Lewis, N. E., Rossant, J. (1982) Mechanism of size regulation in mouse embryo aggregates J. Embryol. exp. Morph 72, 169-181 Recommended by James Briscoe (Francis Crick Institute)     As our previous forgotten[…]

Pluripotency in the mouse and beyond…

Posted by on February 4th, 2016

Preimplantation development establishes the founding cell population of the adult mammal in the epiblast. This naïve pluripotent state employs a unique hand of transcription factors to ensure epigenetic resetting and unbiased embryonic potential. In rodents, naïve pluripotency can be captured in the form of embryonic stem (ES) cells1-4, however other mammals have proven more refractory.[…]

What do songbirds tell us about ES cells?

Posted by on January 8th, 2016

A running joke amongst avian developmental biologists is that the chicken (Gallus gallus) is the tastiest of the model organisms. A typical response from some of my mouse, frog or fish friends, would be that that is where the advantages end – the lack of the ability to do genetics in birds present limitations in[…]

Time-Lapse Recording of Pre-Implantation Mouse Development

Posted by on January 6th, 2016

This four-day long time-lapse shows the development of pre-implantation mouse embryos from the 2-cell stage to over 100-cells as the expanded blastocysts hatch from their zona pellucidas. These embryos were imaged using two-photon microscopy, which enabled us to visualize and track individual cells and lineages throughout pre-implantation development with good spatiotemporal resolution and excellent viability.[…]