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Displaying posts with the tag: genetics [Clear Filter]

“Working with Zebrafish Genome Resources” Workshop during the 8th European Zebrafish Meeting

Posted by on July 18th, 2013

This was my first time in lovely Barcelona. I travelled from London the day before the zebrafish meeting kicked-off (in order to be well rested and alert for all the talks and posters!). I attended the “Working with Zebrafish Genome Resources” workshop and I have to say it was absolutely helpful for any scientist working[…]

From Sequence to Function

Posted by on May 17th, 2013

  It took longer than the human genome, if by only a few years, but it has finally arrived. The sequencing of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) genome reported in Howe et al. is one of two zebrafish publications to recently appear in  the journal Nature.  The second article, Kettleborough et al., makes use of this[…]

Postdoc and PhD positions: Growth control in Drosophila

Posted by on March 20th, 2013

Post-doctoral and PhD positions are available in the lab of Savraj Grewal, University of Calgary, Canada. (https://www.facebook.com/The.Grewal.Lab). The main focus of the lab is to study the control of growth using Drosophila as a model system. We use a combination of molecular, genetic and proteomic approaches to investigate the cell-cell signalling pathways and the genetic[…]

At the cutting edge of molecular biology: 25 years of Genes & Development

Posted by on October 18th, 2012

The Genetics Society’s 2012 Autumn Meeting celebrating the 25th Anniversary of Genes & Development There have been exciting advances in molecular analyses of genetic and epigenetic regulation of key cellular processes.  This meeting will  focus on issues such as chromatin, epigenetics and gene regulation, replication, checkpoints and DNA repair, RNA function and control as they[…]

The IMPC: a new era in mouse genetics

Posted by on April 26th, 2012

The sophistication of genetic tools and the relative ease of breeding and housing mean that the mouse is the most widely used mammalian organism for basic and biomedical research. The genotype-phenotype information that will emerge from the efforts of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), now well into its first year, will advance all areas[…]

FlyBase 2012 User Survey

Posted by on March 20th, 2012

Dear Colleagues,   FlyBase has begun to plan for the competitive renewal of FlyBase funding, which will be submitted to NIH in several months. EXTENSIVE INPUT from the community of FlyBase users is invaluable in two ways. (1) It is a crucial source of input to help us determine our priorities for the next five year period. (2) The[…]

Basic Scientist – Assistant, Associate, or Professor

Posted by on January 18th, 2012

        BASIC SCIENTIST ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE, or PROFESSOR DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY / HEAD AND NECK SURGERY STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE     Faculty Position in the University Tenure Line- Basic Sciences Stanford SOM     The Department of OHNS (http://med.stanford.edu/ohns/) is recruiting for a basic science tenure-track faculty position.  The successful candidate[…]

Mammalian Genetics and Development Workshop

Posted by on November 2nd, 2011

THE MAMMALIAN GENETICS AND DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP A meeting of the Genetics Society Venue: UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH Date: November 17th 2011. Organisers: Nick Greene, Andrew Ward & Andrew Copp The Mammalian Genetics and Development Workshop is an annual meeting covering any aspects of the genetics and development of[…]

The EMBO Meeting 2011 – Abstract submission and registration now open

Posted by on March 1st, 2011

10 – 13 September 2011, Vienna, Austria Featuring more than 120 world-class scientific speakers, including: Richard Axel, Susan Lindquist, Eric Wieschaus and Giacomo Rizzolatti. Three plenary lecture sessions: microbiology of infection, genome evolution and neuroscience. 21 concurrent sessions juxtaposing classical fields of research with those exploring new frontiers in molecular biology. Daily poster sessions, career[…]

Celebrating NYE with Bioluminescence

Posted by on December 31st, 2010

Let me take you on a Bioluminescent journey across many kingdoms. If you’re not well acquainted with the term, it’s the ability of living things to chemically produce light. It’s also a natural widespread feature to many organisms, from jellyfish to algae, fireflies to fungi. In recent years, it’s become a standard molecular biological tool for[…]