the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: live-imaging [Clear Filter]

Polarizing morphogenesis: epithelia dance the polonaise

Posted by on June 13th, 2018

The story behind our recent paper: Counter-rotational cell flows drive morphological and cell fate asymmetries in mammalian hair follicles. Maureen Cetera, Liliya Leybova, Bradley Joyce & Danelle Devenport, Nature Cell Biology.    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a fascinating biological problem because it spans such vast biological scales, from nanometers to meters of spatial organization. When[…]

Postdoctoral position on the mechanobiology of vertebrate morphogenesis

Posted by on June 4th, 2018

The Nerurkar Lab is looking for Postdoctoral Researchers with an interest in the interplay between molecular and mechanical aspects of vertebrate morphogenesis. Using the chick embryo, we combine live in vivo imaging, embryology and molecular genetics with engineering and physics approaches to study how developmental signals modulate physical forces that shape the embryo, and how[…]

Christmas Confetti lights to understand the embryonic origins of blood

Posted by on November 1st, 2017

My PhD focused in deciphering molecular mechanisms implicated in cell cycle regulation in embryonic and adult tissues. As many others in this field I became fascinated by the experiments by Yamanaka and colleagues and this prompted me to transition into the stem cell world. For this reason I joined Shannon McKinney-Freeman’s laboratory in 2012. Here,[…]

PhD position in Cell Biology of Neuronal Differentiation at the University of Manchester

Posted by on October 17th, 2016

  Applications are invited from highly motivated and enthusiastic individuals for a BBSRC DTP funded PhD position in the laboratory of Dr. Raman Das at the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health at the University of Manchester. This position will commence in September 2017.   This project builds on our recent discovery of a new form[…]

Carthew & Mani Labs Postdoc Search

Posted by on May 20th, 2016

The Carthew and Mani Labs are looking to hire a joint postdoc with familiarity in live-imaging and quantitative analysis. Building on the expertise of both labs, the goal of the project is to construct a live imaging platform for eye development with a view to explore the coupled dynamics of cell-cell signaling, mechanical forces, and[…]

X-rays and frog embryos: new features of gastrulation revealed

Posted by on August 19th, 2013

For decades, the development of the early embryo and patterning of tissues has been studied with the help of a workhorse of developmental biology, the frog embryo.  Xenopus embryos are large and undergo clear morphological changes throughout their development that make them very quick and easy to work with in answering questions surrounding the formation[…]

Asymmetric Cell Division – PhD and Postdoc position available

Posted by on April 2nd, 2013

      Asymmetric cell division of neural stem cells Funding for a PhD and a postdoc position is immediately available in the lab of Jens Januschke at the College of Life Sciences (University of Dundee, UK) to study asymmetric cell division in Drosophila. The projects address how stem cells produce two daughter cells with[…]

Comparative epithelial morphogenesis research positions (PhD, Postdoc)

Posted by on October 26th, 2011

From early 2012, a PhD studentship and a postdoctoral position are available in the Panfilio lab (in Cologne, Germany) to investigate morphogenesis of the insect extraembryonic membranes.  As protective covers for the embryo, these simple epithelia are a defining feature of the insects and have been linked to their evolutionary success.  However, in order to[…]

Live imaging of stem cell maintenance, loss, and renewal in the Drosophila testis

Posted by on July 28th, 2011

Stem cells have often been imaged live in culture, but very few stem cell systems are conducive to live imaging within their native tissues.  An essential property of adult stem cells that they are maintained at specific anatomical locations called niches.  The interactions between stem cells and their niche are crucial, but are often disrupted[…]