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Displaying posts with the tag: modelling [Clear Filter]

Plant stem cells strive towards equality

Posted by on February 8th, 2019

By George Bassel and Iain Johnston Multicellular organs consist of collections of cells which come together to achieve what individual cells cannot. The establishment of order in complex tissues has long been a subject of interest, dating back to the origins of microscopy itself. Previous studies have proposed rules which predict when a cell will[…]

Sex combs in motion

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

Using computer simulations and mathematical modeling to study the evolution of morphogenesis   Juan N. Malagon and Ernest Ho tell the story behind their recent paper in PLOS Computational Biology. In the Larsen lab, we are interested in testing a 50-year old question: How do sex combs rotate in fruit flies? Despite extensive studies of the[…]

The people behind the papers – Joe Shawky & Lance Davidson

Posted by on October 24th, 2018

The construction of complex three-dimensional tissue structures during embryogenesis requires precise control of cell and tissue mechanics. The Xenopus embryo provides a powerful tool for interrogating this relationship, as demonstrated by a recent Development paper reporting the use of tissue explants to test predictions of mechanical models. We caught up with first author and recent graduate Joseph[…]

PhD position in computational morphogenesis

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

We invite students to apply for a PhD position in computational morphogenesis at the Gene Expression and Morphogenesis Unit (http://cellcollectives.com/) at the Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology (http://www.cabd.es), in the charming city of Seville, southern Spain. The candidate will be co-supervised by Dr. Luciano Marcon and Dr. Juan R. Martinez-Moraes and will work in the[…]

Clone Wars: A New Model

Posted by on October 1st, 2018

From the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine blog.   Stem cell turnover and tissue maintenance is a stochastic process. This means that a randomly occurring mutation has an unknown chance of becoming fixed and spreading within a tissue. Clonal mutations have been observed in apparently healthy tissue, increase in frequency with age and –[…]

The people behind the papers – Kana Ishimatsu, Tom Hiscock & Sean Megason

Posted by on June 12th, 2018

Somites are segmented structures  which give rise to numerous tissues in the vertebrate body. It has long been observed that somites scale in size with the overall size of the embryo, both as development proceeds and between individuals of different sizes, but the molecular underpinnings of this process have remained controversial. A new paper in[…]

The people behind the papers – Ross Carter, Yara Sánchez-Corrales, Verônica Grieneisen & Athanasius (Stan) Marée

Posted by on November 29th, 2017

Pavement cells in plant leaves were identified as a puzzle which deviated  from normal cell shape rules by D’Arcy Thompson in his classic text On Growth and Form. Now modern approaches allow researchers to revisit these problems and try to uncover the rules that govern pavement cell topology during leaf development. This week we feature a[…]

Paris – Cambridge – Paris: a Megakaryocyte story

Posted by on November 14th, 2016

The first news came as a shock: so the British Railways are not always perfectly on time? For an Italian, that was a massive cultural shock. The second one was even more surprising: English weather is not that bad; actually, it is better than Parisian weather. But still, I was unable, on the train from Paris to Cambridge, to stop thinking about how[…]

Obituary: Hans Meinhardt (1938-2016)

Posted by on March 29th, 2016

This obituary first appeared in Development.   Patrick Müller and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard reflect on the life and career of their colleague Hans Meinhardt.   Hans Meinhardt, a pioneer in the field of theoretical biology, died on 11 February 2016 in Tübingen. He made numerous important contributions to developmental biology by spearheading the use of mathematical models[…]

Applying tandem timers to measure signalling and gene expression dynamics in developing embryos

Posted by on January 11th, 2016

The signalling systems that conduct the orchestra of embryonic development are fantastically complex and dynamic. We owe much of our knowledge of in vivo signalling dynamics to advances in microscopy and protein tagging with fluorescent reporters that have allowed visualization of signalling proteins. Looking forward, however, it is clear that simply analyzing the localization patterns[…]