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Displaying posts with the tag: mouse [Clear Filter]

Postdoctoral Positions – RNA pathways in development and disease – NIH/NCI

Posted by on April 19th, 2018

We have open postdoctoral positions in our lab. We are looking for researchers interested in understanding the mechanisms through which non-coding RNAs and RNA metabolic pathways regulate gene expression in mammals and how these mechanisms impact animal development and disease. Our lab uses a combination of mouse models and genetic tools together with biochemical and[…]

Postdoc position (Francis Crick Institute, London): Developmental origins of health and longevity

Posted by on February 20th, 2018

An exciting opportunity to be part of a pioneering biomedical research institute, dedicated to innovation and science. A postdoctoral research post in the laboratory of Dr. Alex P. Gould is now available. We are looking for a highly motivated researcher to identify the, as yet unknown, molecular mechanisms by which dietary nutrients and oxidative stress[…]

Postdoctoral Fellow in Neurodevelopment

Posted by on January 18th, 2018

Applications are invited from highly motivated individuals who are interested in fundamental mechanisms of neuronal migration and axon guidance. The main focus of our research is to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the development of neural circuits using the embryonic spinal cord as a model system (http://www.ucmm.umu.se/english/research/sara-wilson/). The fellowship is funded for two[…]

The people behind the papers – Chloé Dominici & Alain Chédotal

Posted by on January 18th, 2018

Vertebrate brain development is characterised by cell migration, as neurons are often born far from where they need to end up. Migration is regulated by guidance cues and their receptors, but, problematically, many of these molecules are expressed throughout the brain, complicating efforts to spatially and temporally pin down their function. A paper in the[…]

The people behind the papers – Simon Lane & Keith Jones

Posted by on October 4th, 2017

Checkpoints ensure that mouse oocytes with DNA damage arrest in meiosis I, preventing non-viable embryo formation, however the mechanisms which activate this checkpoint have so far eluded researchers. This week we feature a paper published in the latest issue of Development that reveals that the unique ability of mouse oocytes to sense DNA damage by[…]

Workshop on HREM imaging and mouse phenotyping

Posted by on August 8th, 2017

Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) is a large-scale imaging and phenotyping  programme for genetically modified mouse embryos. For embryos at E14.5, the key imaging technique is High Resolution Episcopic Microscopy (HREM), and the resulting images are used to comprehensively phenotype the embryos using a systematic approach.     With a combination of lectures,[…]

9.5 million knockout mouse embryo images now available

Posted by on July 20th, 2017

A new set of DMDD embryo and placenta data has been released, taking our total dataset to 9.5 million images of around 1300 embryos. DMDD is a primary screen of embryonic lethal knockout mice, and all data can be freely accessed at dmdd.org.uk. Detailed phenotypes are available for embryos from 73 different knockout lines, and[…]

Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

Why are geneticists measuring the webbing between mouse embryo fingers?

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

A new paper published in Journal of Anatomy shows that measuring the amount of inter-digital webbing in mouse embryos between 14 and 15 days gestation is the best way to find out their exact stage of development. So why is this important to a geneticist? If we want to discover a causal link between a gene[…]

New phenotype dataset available for embryonic-lethal mouse knockouts

Posted by on December 1st, 2016

    This post originally appeared on Annotations, the DMDD blog.   New image and phenotype data for embryos and placentas from embryonic lethal knockout mouse lines has been made available on the DMDD website today. The knockout data includes the ciliary gene Rpgrip1l as well as Atg16l1, a gene encoding a protein that forms[…]