the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: wnt [Clear Filter]

Layered patterning systems in hair development

Posted by on September 28th, 2017

The story behind our recent paper  ‘Hierarchical patterning modes orchestrate hair follicle morphogenesis‘ , finding that distinct patterning mechanisms can co-exist during embryonic organ formation.   From the spots of a leopard and stripes on a zebra to the pigmentation of sea shells and arrangement of sand dunes in a desert, repeating patterns are present[…]

Multiple stem cells, population asymmetry and position-dependent heterogeneity emerge as common features of a niche for Drosophila Follicle Stem Cells and mammalian Intestinal Stem Cells

Posted by on June 16th, 2017

A discussion of “Alternative direct stem cell derivatives defined by stem cell location and graded Wnt signalling,” Nat Cell Biol, 2017. 19(5): p. 433-444.   We have recently revised the model of Follicle Stem Cell (FSC) organization in the Drosophila ovary, showing that there is a much larger population of stem cells than formerly realized, that[…]

Researchers grow ‘seed’ of spinal cord tissue in a dish

Posted by on September 3rd, 2014

Medical Research Council (MRC) scientists have for the first time managed to turn stem cells into the specialised cells that go on to form spinal cord, muscle and bone tissue in the growing embryo. Their discovery could lead to a new way of studying degenerative conditions such as spinal muscular atrophy, which affects the nerve[…]

Smart signaling in the developing brain

Posted by on May 10th, 2012

The WNT pathway functions in so many processes during development that it is easy to be jealous of its multi-tasking abilities.  A recent paper in Development describes the role of WNT signaling in neural stem cell proliferation. WNT signaling plays an important role in neural development, axon guidance, cell polarity, and stem cell biology.  WNT[…]

Postdoctoral position – MRC Department of Biomedical/Developmental Genetics, University of Sheffield, UK

Posted by on October 26th, 2011

Overview The Research Associate will work in the MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics within the Department of Biomedical Science.  The department has an active community of researchers specialising in different aspects of developmental biology.  You will take part in a project aiming to understand how cell proliferation is temporally integrated with digit patterning[…]

In Development This Week (Vol. 138, Issue 22)

Posted by on October 25th, 2011

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: The skin-healing touch of Lhx2 Skin repair after injury involves the recruitment of undifferentiated progenitor cells from nearby hair follicles (HFs) into the regenerating epidermis. The bulge and the secondary hair germ of HFs contain distinct populations of epithelial stem cells, and now Vladimir Botchkarev[…]

Postdoc position in gut morphogenesis

Posted by on October 4th, 2011

An NIH-funded postdoctoral position is available in the Nascone-Yoder laboratory at North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC, USA) to study the role of non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling in Xenopus gut morphogenesis. The successful applicant will elucidate the cellular and molecular basis of gut tube lumen formation, gut tube elongation and rotation, and/or digestive epithelial morphogenesis.  We[…]

PhD-student Position in Thalamus Development / Tissue Engineering in Zebrafish

Posted by on September 21st, 2011

We are looking for a highly motivated PhD student to study development and regeneration of the thalamus in zebrafish. Stroke is a prevalent and devastating disorder, and no treatment is currently available to restore lost neuronal function after stroke. In 10% of all stroke patients, a remote damage of the thalamus has been documented. We[…]

Sperm stem cells and that trusty old friend Wnt

Posted by on July 14th, 2011

Sperm stem cells have a lot riding on their success.  Not only must they produce the actual sperm, but they must maintain a life-long supply.  So, the self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells is a finely-tuned talent of these stem cells.  A recent paper in the Journal of Cell Science describes the role of Wnt signaling[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 12)

Posted by on May 24th, 2011

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: How transcriptional silencing goes into reverse The Polycomb group (PcG) machinery silences terminal differentiation genes in stem cell lineages. Reversal of this epigenetic transcriptional silencing is implicated in the selective activation of these genes during differentiation, but little is known about the mechanism of this[…]