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Genetics Unzipped podcast: From Philadelphia to Baltimore: Tales of Chromosomes, Cancer Cells and Henrietta Lacks

Posted by on October 8th, 2020

In this episode we’re taking a road trip from Philadelphia to Baltimore, exploring stories of chromosomal cut-and-paste, cancer cures and Henrietta Lacks’ incredible cancer cells.

Genetics Unzipped: Involving patients in genomics research

Posted by on April 9th, 2020

We find out why it’s so important to make sure that both academic and commercial genomic research studies are done with rather than on participants.

Labs in lockdown

Posted by on March 13th, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has led to travel restrictions, conference cancellations and university closures. How do labs function in various states of lockdown? What happens to model organisms and long running experiments? On the personal side, how can we counter the loss of lab camaraderie? And education – how can you run a course from home?[…]

Postdoc position on ageing in the Drosophila nervous system

Posted by on September 6th, 2018

BBSRC funded postdoc position in the laboratory of Natalia Sánchez-Soriano (https://sanchezlab.wordpress.com), to study the cell biology of neuronal ageing and the underlying mechanisms.     On this project you will study the harmful changes that neurons undergo at the subcellular level during ageing, and unravel the cascade of events that cause them. The focus will[…]

Accelerated Frogs: Developmental Biology meets Particle Physics

Posted by on August 20th, 2014

I previously wrote a post about the development of a 4-D X-Ray Tomography technique for imaging early Xenopus embryos. Frog embryos are opaque due to their yolky composition and this has proved a challenge for traditional optical microscopy of events in the early stages of Xenopus embryo development. However Julian Moosmann, Ralf Hofmann and Jubin[…]

A day in the life of a Platynereis dumerilii lab

Posted by on June 25th, 2014

Hello! I am Maggie Pruitt, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology at Iowa State University (Ames, Iowa, USA – think middle America or fields upon fields). I work in Dr. Stephan Schneider’s evo-devo laboratory, and my work mostly focuses on studying components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway during early[…]

On how odd critters can answer important questions

Posted by on March 27th, 2013

Sproing! Sproing! Sproing! If there is one animal that deserves its own cartoon sound, it is the jerboa – a bipedal desert rodent with extraordinarily elongated hindlegs, fused foot bones, and loss of the first and fifth toes. I blogged here from China last spring during the most recent field collection of jerboa embryos, and[…]

Gene regulation and developmental biology at the Royal Society

Posted by on November 5th, 2012

Last week, the Royal Society hosted a meeting entitled “Regulation from a distance: Long-range control of gene expression in development and disease”. The impressive London offices of the Society (complete with double helix-inspired door handles) added a sense of occasion to what was bound to be a fascinating meeting, based on the list of excellent[…]