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The Curious Case of Protocadherin 19 Epilepsy

Posted by on March 12th, 2018

Daniel Pederick & Paul Thomas Comment on our paper: Pederick, et al. 2018. Abnormal Cell Sorting Underlies the Unique X-Linked Inheritance of PCDH19 Epilepsy. Neuron 97 (1).   Here we discuss the curious case of female-restricted epilepsy, an unusual disorder caused by mutations in the Protocadherin 19 (PCDH19) gene. How changes in this cell adhesion[…]

The future of human reproduction: Stepping back from visions of Gattaca

Posted by on January 16th, 2018

The impact of developmental biology on society is particularly acute when it comes to reproduction – research informs efforts to assist reproduction and understand what happens when pregnancy goes wrong. Recent developments in stem cells, culturing conditions, gene editing and sequencing are also revealing aspects of human embryonic development previously hidden from us. Here at[…]

Addgene Resources to Grow Your Developmental Biology Toolkit

Posted by on November 8th, 2017

Addgene is a global, nonprofit repository that was created to help scientists share plasmids. Before we go over the developmental biology resources available at Addgene, here’s a little background on our organization. Our mission is to accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful research materials and information. Labs deposit plasmids with Addgene at[…]

Postdoctoral Fellow Position – Genetics of Congenital Craniofacial and Neurodevelopment Malformations

Posted by on October 10th, 2017

An NIH-funded Postdoctoral Research Associate position is available in the Stottmann lab in the Divisions of Human Genetics and Developmental Biology.  Our interests are in the genetic basis of congenital malformations affecting the forebrain and craniofacial structures. Projects involve characterizing novel genes and mutations identified through forward genetic approaches in both mouse and human. We[…]

Research assistant in Development Biology, Sheffield University

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

A Wellcome Trust/Royal Society funded Research Assistant position is available in Dr Kyra Campbell’s research group. This is a fantastic opportunity to join the Campbell group, who are focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial cell plasticity during development and disease. We study how this fundamental property is orchestrated during morphogenesis of the Drosophila[…]

Reactions to the CRISPR human embryo paper

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

A paper published online yesterday in Nature (and ‘leaked’ a week ago by the MIT Technology Review) describes the use of CRISPR in human embryos to correct a mutation that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The work has hit the headlines and sparked debate about its utility and implications. Collated below are responses from the field (or[…]

Postdoctoral position in chromatin and epigenetic control of Drosophila development

Posted by on June 30th, 2016

Stockholm University, Sweden, invites applications for one postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Professor Mattias Mannervik at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute ( The position is scheduled to start as soon as possible.   Transcriptional coregulators are proteins that facilitate communication between transcription factors and the basal transcription apparatus, in part by[…]

2016 CSHL Xenopus Course (last few spots!) Deadline Feb 21

Posted by on February 12th, 2016

In order to encourage applicants to the 2016 Xenopus Course at Cold Spring Harbor, we able to offer substantial support to offset course costs thanks to support from the NICHD, Helmsley Charitable Trust, and HHMI to eligible candidates. We are particularly interested in scientists with an interdisciplinary or non-traditional background, or scientists new to Xenopus.[…]

Question of the month- patenting public research

Posted by on January 29th, 2016

Last week the Montreal Neurological Institute announced that it will become the first fully Open Science academic institute. In addition to  making their results and data available for free upon publication, this initiative also includes a  commitment not to register patents on any of their discoveries. This announcement comes in contrast with the ongoing heated dispute on[…]

Question of the month- CRISPR technology

Posted by on April 23rd, 2015

This week a group in China published a paper in Protein & Cell claiming to have genetically edited a human embryo using CRISPR technology. This paper is generating a lot of debate for many reasons, from the type of embryo used in the experiment, to where it was (or wasn’t) published. More broadly though, it forces us to think about[…]