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Time to crack coding?

Posted by on March 24th, 2020

As labs shut down in response to the coronavirus pandemic, some might be unsure of what to do next. Even if your project doesn’t have a computational (i.e. bioinformatic) aspect, knowing some code can still be useful to present your research. Importantly, learning to code is particularly well-suited for the current situation, because there are[…]

Development and the COVID-19 pandemic

Posted by on March 23rd, 2020

Last week, I and the rest of the Development team said goodbye to our lovely office, and a new era of remote working has begun. But we’re lucky – editorial work can (we hope!) proceed pretty much as normal from our desks at home. Of course, things are not so easy for researchers: shutting down[…]

eBSDB/GenSoc 2020 plans

Posted by on March 14th, 2020

  UPDATE 16 MARCH events timetable added below Following the cancellation of BSDB/GenSoc2020, the meeting organisers have been seeking ways to maintain some elements of the meeting through online interactions. We do not plan to run a full virtual meeting, but we do plan to experiment with ways to recreate some of the useful and fun[…]

BSDB meeting cancelled

Posted by on March 10th, 2020

Here at the Node and Development, the BSDB Spring meeting is always the first thing to go into our conference calendar, as an institution for the UK developmental biology community. The 2020 meeting, co-organised with the Genetics Society and due to start on Sunday, has just been cancelled due to concerns about spread of Covid-19[…]

Moving neuromuscular disorders research forward: from novel models to clinical studies

Posted by on February 27th, 2020

This Editorial by Maaike van Putten, Julija Hmeljak, Annemieke Aartsma-Rus and James J. Dowling was recently published in Development’s sister journal Disease Models & Mechanisms, announcing a new Special Issue. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) encompass a diverse group of genetic diseases characterized by loss of muscle functionality. Despite extensive efforts to develop therapies, no curative treatment[…]

A Symposium to Honor Dr. Drew Noden’s Contribution to Science

Posted by on January 27th, 2020

50 Years of Head Developmental Research – A Symposium to Honor Dr. Drew Noden’s Contribution to Science WHERE? NYU College of Dentistry (345 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10010) WHEN? May 18, 2020; 8.30am – 5pm Registration: FREE; contact Rui.Diogo@howard.edu Organizers: Rui Diogo;Jean-Pierre N Saint-Jeannet; Richard A Schneider;Janine M. Ziermann   (+1 rating, 1 votes)Loading…

The Node Network: a global directory of developmental and stem cell biologists

Posted by on January 23rd, 2020

We’re excited to announce the launch of the Node Network, a global directory of developmental and stem cell biologists. The Node Network is designed to help those organising conferences, assembling committees, seeking speakers for seminar series, looking for referees and so on to identify individuals who might not otherwise come to mind. The Network is[…]

Review Commons launches

Posted by on December 10th, 2019

Review Commons is a new publishing platform from ASAPbio and EMBO providing independent peer review before journal submission. According to the homepage it will “provide authors with a Refereed Preprint, which includes the authors’ manuscript, reports from a single round of peer review and the authors’ response, [and] facilitate author-directed submission of Refereed Preprints to[…]

The Company of Biologists announces pilot transitional open access agreement with Jisc

Posted by on November 21st, 2019

The Company of Biologists, publisher of Development, is excited to announce a two-year pilot transitional open access (OA) agreement with Jisc from January 2020. The ‘Read and Publish’ deal will permit researchers at participating institutions unlimited access to all three subscription journals from The Company of Biologists, including the full archive dating back as far as 1853,[…]

How do cells know their future and forget their past

Posted by on November 7th, 2019

All cells in the body contain the same genetic material. The difference between cells therefore depends solely on which genes are expressed or ‘turned on’. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have gained new insights into how genes are turned on and off and how the cells “forget their past” while developing into a[…]