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Displaying posts with the tag: evo-devo [Clear Filter]

A day in the life of a Kabuto-mushi (rhinoceros beetle) lab

Posted by on December 10th, 2018

I am Shinichi Morita, a postdoctoral researcher in Teruyuki Niimi’s lab at the National Institute for Basic Biology, Japan (Fig. 1A, B). Our research interests focus on the evolutionary novelties that insects have acquired, and how various insect morphologies have arisen during evolution (Fig. 1C-P).     Beetle horns are thought to be an evolutionary[…]

Sex combs in motion

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

Using computer simulations and mathematical modeling to study the evolution of morphogenesis   Juan N. Malagon and Ernest Ho tell the story behind their recent paper in PLOS Computational Biology. In the Larsen lab, we are interested in testing a 50-year old question: How do sex combs rotate in fruit flies? Despite extensive studies of the[…]

Alan Turing’s patterning system can explain the arrangement of shark scales

Posted by on November 7th, 2018

Understanding how complex biological patterns arise is a long standing and fascinating area of scientific research. The patterning, or spatial arrangement, of vertebrate skin appendages (such as feathers, hair and scales) has enabled diverse adaptations, allowing animals to both survive and thrive in varied and challenging environments. Such adaptations include temperature control of mammalian hair1[…]

Spider segmentation gets its SOX on!

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

There is a vast amount of information known about how some animals pattern their bodies into repeated segments, especially in the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, when compared to other arthropods, there are several characteristics that are derived in the fruit fly. It has a very short development time, a syncytium at the blastoderm stage allowing[…]

Postdoc – The evolution of spiral cleavage

Posted by on October 4th, 2018

An ERC-funded Postdoctoral Research Assistant position is available at Queen Mary University of London in Dr José M (Chema) Martín-Durán’s group. The project focuses on the epigenetic regulation of conditional and autonomous development in spiral cleavage. Queen Mary is one of the top research-led universities in the UK and was ranked 9th among the UK[…]

A day in the life of a colonial tunicate laboratory

Posted by on August 28th, 2018

Have you heard of an animal that can lose most of its body tissues and the remnant tissues aggregate to regenerate the lost parts and recovery its original form? Do you know an animal that can quickly colonize marine surfaces by asexual reproduction, just like weed would in terrestrial environments ? Do you know an[…]

A day in the life of a Capitella teleta lab

Posted by on July 10th, 2018

It’s undoubtedly the middle of summer here in Saint Augustine, Florida. Daily temperatures are soaring into the 90s, and we’re grateful if the humidity dips below 70%. Thankfully, the Seaver lab doesn’t have to contend with much of this heat. Instead, our members are inside, comfortable though busier than ever, mentoring summer interns, piloting new[…]

Postdoctoral Positions — Neural crest stem cells, pigment pattern, adult form

Posted by on June 1st, 2018

Postdoctoral positions are available in the Parichy lab at University of Virginia. The lab studies development using zebrafish and related species. Current emphases include hormonal control over post-embryonic neural crest stem cells, plasticity in cell state, evolution of novel cell types, and mechanisms of pattern formation and cell–cell communication within zebrafish and across Danio species.[…]

Medaka fish sheds light on the evolutionary origin of vertebrate pair appendages

Posted by on April 23rd, 2018

Link to the paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-018-0080-5   The evolutionary history of vertebrate appendages Have you ever wondered how our hands and feet evolved? This question, which commonly evokes fish crawling from sea to land, has long been a subject of interest, both for palaeontologists and developmental biologists. Appendages are an important part of the tool kit[…]

Funded places for early-career researchers at a human brain development & evolution workshop

Posted by on March 8th, 2018

This summer, the Company of Biologists, the not-for-profit publisher of Development, is running a Workshop on ‘Development and evolution of the human neocortex‘, organised by Victor Borrell, Wieland Huttner and Arnold Kriegstein. The Company of Biologists Workshops provide leading experts and early career scientists from a diverse range of scientific backgrounds with a stimulating environment for the cross-fertilisation[…]