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Displaying posts with the tag: evo-devo [Clear Filter]

YEN Conference 2017: Registration open now!

Posted by on February 8th, 2017

Young Embryologist Network 9th Annual Conference. 9th May 2017 at the Institute of Child Health, UCL, London. This year, YEN is honoured to have Dr Darren Gilmour from EMBL Heidelberg present the Sammy Lee Memorial Lecture. We are also pleased to host two invited speakers, Dr Karen Liu (King’s College London), and Professor Michael Stumpf (Imperial College London). As well as three abstract-selected talk sessions and a poster[…]

The people behind the papers #12

Posted by on February 1st, 2017

The brown alga Ectocarpus has emerged as a model system for the evolution of muticellularity. Today’s paper, from the current issue of Development, investigates the role and evolutionary history of a gene implicated in Ectocarpus development. We caught up with first author Nicolas Macaisne and supervisor J. Mark Cock of the Station Biologique de Roscoff in Brittany.     Mark, can you[…]

The First International Hemichordate Meeting: the Birth of a Community

Posted by on January 24th, 2017

Tetsuto Miyashita   Certain scientific meetings have their place in the book of history as a visible shift — or a turning point, if you will — in a particular field. The Cuvier-Geoffroy debate at the French Academy of Sciences in 1830 set the tone for the subsequent two centuries of biology in search for[…]

Can you handle the tooth?

Posted by on January 23rd, 2017

Reflections on “Sox2+ progenitors in sharks link taste development with the evolution of regenerative teeth from denticles”, PNAS 113(51), 14769-14774, 2016.   Despite an overwhelming amount of carefully curated data, such as the International Shark Attack File, which indicates that your chances of being bitten by a shark are vanishingly small, humans have had a long and often[…]

A Day in the Life of a Coral Lab

Posted by on November 8th, 2016

Hi, I’m Yuuri Yasuoka, a postdoc in the Marine Genomics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST). Okinawa is a subtropical Japanese island surrounded by beautiful coral reefs (Figure 1). Why do we study coral here? OIST is the best place in Japan to study coral, with the good access[…]

Post-doctoral position in Skeletal Evo-Devo: Canada

Posted by on October 28th, 2016

A post-doctoral position is available in the Franz-Odendaal Bone Development Lab to study the developmental basis of the vertebrate ocular skeleton in a comparative context. Highly motivated and independent individuals with excellent interpersonal skills are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will take a key role in our research program which spans evo-devo, developmental genetics[…]

Postdoctoral position in Skeletal Development: Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted by on September 19th, 2016

A post-doctoral position is available in the Franz-Odendaal Bone Development Lab to study the developmental basis of the vertebrate ocular skeleton in a comparative context. Highly motivated and independent individuals with excellent interpersonal skills are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will take a key role in our research program which interests spans evo-devo, developmental[…]

The people behind the papers #3

Posted by on September 2nd, 2016

Today’s paper is from the latest issue of Development and  introduces the squid Doryteuthis pealeii as a lophotrochozoan model for eye development. And the people are PI Jeffrey Gross, Director of the Louis J. Fox Center for Vision Restoration and Professor of Ophthalmology and Developmental Biology at the University of Pittsburgh, and lead author Kristen Koenig, who has[…]

Postdoc: Comparative epithelial morphogenesis

Posted by on July 23rd, 2016

From autumn 2016, a postdoctoral research position is available in the Panfilio lab to investigate morphogenesis of the insect extraembryonic (EE) membranes. These simple epithelia are highly dynamic in their role as transient, protective covers for the embryo. The aim is to understand how EE morphogenesis works at multiple levels of biological organization, from cellular[…]

Gills, fins and the evolution of vertebrate paired appendages

Posted by on April 19th, 2016

The origin of paired fins is a major unresolved issue in vertebrate evolutionary biology, and has been a topic of debate among palaeontologists, comparative anatomists and developmental biologists for over a century. Central to any question of “evolutionary origins” is the concept of homology: the sharing of features due to common ancestry. Homology may explain[…]