the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: evo-devo [Clear Filter]

Funded places for early-career researchers at a human brain development & evolution workshop

Posted by on March 8th, 2018

This summer, the Company of Biologists, the not-for-profit publisher of Development, is running a Workshop on ‘Development and evolution of the human neocortex‘, organised by Victor Borrell, Wieland Huttner and Arnold Kriegstein. The Company of Biologists Workshops provide leading experts and early career scientists from a diverse range of scientific backgrounds with a stimulating environment for the cross-fertilisation[…]

PhD position in Queen Mary University of London: Evolution of axis specification in annelid worms

Posted by on February 23rd, 2018

A PhD studentship is available for a project on the evolution of axis specification modes in spiral cleaving animals. The project will focus on the annelid species Owenia fusiformis, which occupies a key phylogenetic position as the sister lineage to all remaining annelids, and it has recently proven very informative for the study of animal[…]

Why more is better in comparative developmental biology…

Posted by on January 26th, 2018

Our recent paper in “Nature” [1] deconstructs molecular arguments that have been used to homologize bilaterian nerve cords. Our work illustrates well the strength of the comparative approach and the broad sampling across the animal tree of life that we use in my research group at the Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology.   Evo-Devo[…]

Forgotten classics: Making a monotreme

Posted by on October 17th, 2017

T. Thomson Flynn and J.P. Hill. 1939. The Development of the Monotrema – Part IV. Growth of the Ovarian Ovum, Maturation, Fertilisation and Early Cleavage. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, 24, 445-623. T. Thomson Flynn and J.P. Hill. 1947. The Development of the Monotrema – Part VI. The Later Stages of Cleavage and[…]

Evo-devo music

Posted by on September 27th, 2017

It’s rare to see your working life captured in a music video.  This made me happy, I hope you enjoy it. Click the title above. (+4 rating, 4 votes) Loading…

A day in the life of an Oikopleura Lab

Posted by on May 23rd, 2017

The recent bloom of genomic data from all of life’s kingdoms is revealing a novel perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation with a great potential to generate phenotypic diversity and to shape the evolution of gene networks. How do genes become dispensable and subsequently lost? Are patterns of gene loss[…]

Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

YEN Conference 2017: Registration open now!

Posted by on February 8th, 2017

Young Embryologist Network 9th Annual Conference. 9th May 2017 at the Institute of Child Health, UCL, London. This year, YEN is honoured to have Dr Darren Gilmour from EMBL Heidelberg present the Sammy Lee Memorial Lecture. We are also pleased to host two invited speakers, Dr Karen Liu (King’s College London), and Professor Michael Stumpf (Imperial College London). As well as three abstract-selected talk sessions and a poster[…]

The people behind the papers: Nicolas Macaisne & J. Mark Cock

Posted by on February 1st, 2017

The brown alga Ectocarpus has emerged as a model system for the evolution of muticellularity. Today’s paper, from the current issue of Development, investigates the role and evolutionary history of a gene implicated in Ectocarpus development. We caught up with first author Nicolas Macaisne and supervisor J. Mark Cock of the Station Biologique de Roscoff in Brittany.     Mark, can you[…]

The First International Hemichordate Meeting: the Birth of a Community

Posted by on January 24th, 2017

Tetsuto Miyashita   Certain scientific meetings have their place in the book of history as a visible shift — or a turning point, if you will — in a particular field. The Cuvier-Geoffroy debate at the French Academy of Sciences in 1830 set the tone for the subsequent two centuries of biology in search for[…]